IMeasureU Webinar Series

By June 5, 2020 September 25th, 2020 Article, Education

Webinar 1 – Quantifying Human Performance Across Multiple Data Sources

Description:

Continued advances in wearable technology have afforded us unique insights into powerful predictive human performance metrics within a variety of high-profile (e.g., sports and military) naturalistic interactive settings. Typically, these innovative approaches focus almost explicitly on quantifying, optimizing and/or maintaining the execution of the underlying performance. Equally critical, however, is understanding how the human adapts, operates, and recovers between these targeted performance bouts.

Learn from Scott McLean, PhD, how you can develop a holistic and wearable-tech-driven framework through which to maximize performance outcomes, mitigate risk and support long-term behavioral success and stability.

About Scott McLean:

Scott McLean, PhD is a Senior Managing Consultant within Exponent. In that role, he utilizes a wide range of wearable technologies to support human performance readiness and execution optimization and product development and innovation. Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. McLean was the Innovation Director at Fitbit, where he led a large team in the development and verification of a number of wearable tech products. He was also previously a Biomechanics Professor at the University of Michigan, where is work focused on lower limb injury and disease mechanisms and quantifying warfighter performance in naturalistic environments. He has published more than 50 peer reviewed articles and has obtained more than $7 million dollars in national funding to support his research. He is the previous Chair of the American College of Sports Medicine Biomechanics Group and a past Executive Council Member of the International Society of Biomechanics.

For follow up questions you can get in touch with IMeasureU, or email Scott McLean at [email protected]

 

Webinar 2 – Answering Questions with Inertial Sensors: Insights Across a Division 1 Athletics Program

Description:

With 18 months of IMU sensor use, the Human Performance Center at the University of Memphis Athletics will share their applied experiences in the application, strengths, and limitations of the sensors in a multi-sport setting.

The presentation shares insights from completed projects across the Division 1 campus, with key practical lessons based on the experiences of coaches, strength staff, athletic trainers and sports scientists.

Our aim is to provide details of our practical use of the sensors to spur ideas and insights from the listeners, to help you answer your own applied challenges.

As our projects originated from a variety of settings, posed by different sports and different experts, the presentation should hold useful and actionable information ready for interpretation in your own context.

Including stories from load monitoring in soccer and tennis, athlete screening in basketball, athlete rehabilitation in football and technique change in softball and cross country, the simple and straightforward interpretation of data and use of the sensors in practical settings will stimulate ideas and discussion. The presentation will include a ‘Question and Answer’ component to encourage understanding and elaboration on key topics.

About Daniel Greenwood:

Dr. Daniel Greenwood is the director of the Human Performance Center (HPC) at the University of Memphis. The HPC provides applied sport science solutions to practical questions posed by coaching, strength, and athletic training staff. Originally from Australia, he has held applied sport science roles in elite sport for over 15 years, most recently at the Australian Institute of Sport, and has a passion for using science, data, and understanding to improve athlete performance and coaching pedagogy. With a background in biomechanics and specialization in skill acquisition, Daniel’s ecological approach is evident within his research, constantly searching for practical outcomes to applied questions.

 

Webinar 3 – An Introduction to Inertial Measurement Units: Applications for Human Movement

Description:

What is an inertial sensor? How do I know how sensitive my sensor should be? Where is the best place to place a sensor?

Clint Hansen breaks down the fundamentals of what an inertial sensor actually is and what they measure. He will outline how to choose the right one for your population, common pitfalls to look out for, and give examples of how to start applying the sensor data.

His research and clinical practice is focused on understanding and characterizing the biomechanics of human movement, with his most current projects involving the development of digital outcome measures that could serve as objective clinical endpoints. Clint’s extensive experience in clinical movement analysis has been facilitated through the widespread use of 3D motion capture, musculoskeletal modeling and wearable technologies, including EMG, GPS, and IMUs

About Clint Hansen:

Clint is currently a Researcher and the Deputy Head of Research Group at Christian Albrechts University in Kiel, Germany, having previously worked at Aspetar, Qatar as a researcher and ACL Coordinator. His research and clinical practice is focused on understanding and characterizing the biomechanics of human movement, with his most current projects involving the development of digital outcome measures that could serve as objective clinical endpoints.

 

Webinar 4 – Understanding and Optimizing Recovery from Bone Stress Injuries

Description:

Thor Besier offers his expertise with a deep dive into the mechanics of bone stress injury recovery and offers insight into how you can optimize recovery for bone injuries. In this webinar, Thor will outline the underlying mechanisms and physiology of bone healing before offering real-world applied examples of how we can improve bone recovery.

Thor Besier is a Professor at the Auckland Bioengineering Institute and has a joint appointment with the Department of Engineering Science. He completed his Ph.D. in musculoskeletal biomechanics at The University of Western Australia in 2000 and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford University from 2003 to 2006. Thor established Stanford’s Human Performance Laboratory as the Director of Research and was a faculty member in the Department of Orthopaedics at Stanford from 2006 to 2010, before returning home to New Zealand in 2011. Thor’s research combines medical imaging with computational modeling to understand the mechanisms of musculoskeletal injury and suffer hair loss issues. He has published more than 75 scientific articles.

About Thor Besier:

Thor Besier is a Professor at the Auckland Bioengineering Institute and has a joint appointment with the Department of Engineering Science. He completed his Ph.D. in musculoskeletal biomechanics at The University of Western Australia in 2000 and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford University from 2003 to 2006. Thor established Stanford’s Human Performance Laboratory as the Director of Research and was a faculty member in the Department of Orthopaedics at Stanford from 2006 to 2010, before returning home to New Zealand in 2011. Thor’s research combines medical imaging with computational modeling to understand the mechanisms of musculoskeletal injury and disease. He has published more than 100 scientific articles.

Webinar 5 – Understanding external biomechanical load during ACLR rehabilitation

Description:

Blending science into the art of coaching – In this webinar Mark Armitage will discuss how he is exploring different wearable technologies to support him in the quantification of field-based rehabilitation. Using an ACLR case study he will give cutting edge applications into session and drill analysis to improve outcomes during ACL recovery.

About Mark Armitage:

Mark is an accredited (UKSCA) Strength and Conditioning Coach with a wealth of experience working within football. He has worked for Norwich, Southampton, Arsenal and Huddersfield Town Football Clubs as well as the English Football Association. He has a Degree in Sport and Exercise Science, Masters in Strength and Conditioning, Post-Graduate Certificate in Education and is a teaching Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Currently, Mark is completing his PhD at the University of Suffolk where he is the course leader for Strength and Conditioning. He is also a company Director of East Coast Conditioning and Rehabilitation.

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