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IMeasureU Webinar Series

By June 5, 2020 April 28th, 2021 Article, Education

Webinar 1 – Quantifying Human Performance Across Multiple Data Sources

Description:

Continued advances in wearable technology have afforded us unique insights into powerful predictive human performance metrics within a variety of high-profile (e.g., sports and military) naturalistic interactive settings. Typically, these innovative approaches focus almost explicitly on quantifying, optimizing and/or maintaining the execution of the underlying performance. Equally critical, however, is understanding how the human adapts, operates, and recovers between these targeted performance bouts.

Learn from Scott McLean, PhD, how you can develop a holistic and wearable-tech-driven framework through which to maximize performance outcomes, mitigate risk and support long-term behavioral success and stability.

About Scott McLean:

Scott McLean, PhD is a Senior Managing Consultant within Exponent. In that role, he utilizes a wide range of wearable technologies to support human performance readiness and execution optimization and product development and innovation. Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. McLean was the Innovation Director at Fitbit, where he led a large team in the development and verification of a number of wearable tech products. He was also previously a Biomechanics Professor at the University of Michigan, where is work focused on lower limb injury and disease mechanisms and quantifying warfighter performance in naturalistic environments. He has published more than 50 peer reviewed articles and has obtained more than $7 million dollars in national funding to support his research. He is the previous Chair of the American College of Sports Medicine Biomechanics Group and a past Executive Council Member of the International Society of Biomechanics.

For follow up questions you can get in touch with IMeasureU, or email Scott McLean at [email protected]

 

Webinar 2 – Answering Questions with Inertial Sensors: Insights Across a Division 1 Athletics Program

Description:

With 18 months of IMU sensor use, the Human Performance Center at the University of Memphis Athletics will share their applied experiences in the application, strengths, and limitations of the sensors in a multi-sport setting.

The presentation shares insights from completed projects across the Division 1 campus, with key practical lessons based on the experiences of coaches, strength staff, athletic trainers and sports scientists.

Our aim is to provide details of our practical use of the sensors to spur ideas and insights from the listeners, to help you answer your own applied challenges.

As our projects originated from a variety of settings, posed by different sports and different experts, the presentation should hold useful and actionable information ready for interpretation in your own context.

Including stories from load monitoring in soccer and tennis, athlete screening in basketball, athlete rehabilitation in football and technique change in softball and cross country, the simple and straightforward interpretation of data and use of the sensors in practical settings will stimulate ideas and discussion. The presentation will include a ‘Question and Answer’ component to encourage understanding and elaboration on key topics.

About Daniel Greenwood:

Dr. Daniel Greenwood is the director of the Human Performance Center (HPC) at the University of Memphis. The HPC provides applied sport science solutions to practical questions posed by coaching, strength, and athletic training staff. Originally from Australia, he has held applied sport science roles in elite sport for over 15 years, most recently at the Australian Institute of Sport, and has a passion for using science, data, and understanding to improve athlete performance and coaching pedagogy. With a background in biomechanics and specialization in skill acquisition, Daniel’s ecological approach is evident within his research, constantly searching for practical outcomes to applied questions.

Webinar 3 – An Introduction to Inertial Measurement Units: Applications for Human Movement

Description:

What is an inertial sensor? How do I know how sensitive my sensor should be? Where is the best place to place a sensor?

Clint Hansen breaks down the fundamentals of what an inertial sensor actually is and what they measure. He will outline how to choose the right one for your population, common pitfalls to look out for, and give examples of how to start applying the sensor data.

His research and clinical practice is focused on understanding and characterizing the biomechanics of human movement, with his most current projects involving the development of digital outcome measures that could serve as objective clinical endpoints. Clint’s extensive experience in clinical movement analysis has been facilitated through the widespread use of 3D motion capture, musculoskeletal modeling and wearable technologies, including EMG, GPS, and IMUs

About Clint Hansen:

Clint is currently a Researcher and the Deputy Head of Research Group at Christian Albrechts University in Kiel, Germany, having previously worked at Aspetar, Qatar as a researcher and ACL Coordinator. His research and clinical practice is focused on understanding and characterizing the biomechanics of human movement, with his most current projects involving the development of digital outcome measures that could serve as objective clinical endpoints.

Webinar 4 – Understanding and Optimizing Recovery from Bone Stress Injuries

Description:

Thor Besier offers his expertise with a deep dive into the mechanics of bone stress injury recovery and offers insight into how you can optimize recovery for bone injuries. In this webinar, Thor will outline the underlying mechanisms and physiology of bone healing before offering real-world applied examples of how we can improve bone recovery.

Thor Besier is a Professor at the Auckland Bioengineering Institute and has a joint appointment with the Department of Engineering Science. He completed his Ph.D. in musculoskeletal biomechanics at The University of Western Australia in 2000 and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford University from 2003 to 2006. Thor established Stanford’s Human Performance Laboratory as the Director of Research and was a faculty member in the Department of Orthopaedics at Stanford from 2006 to 2010, before returning home to New Zealand in 2011. Thor’s research combines medical imaging with computational modeling to understand the mechanisms of musculoskeletal injury and suffer hair loss issues. He has published more than 75 scientific articles.

About Thor Besier:

Thor Besier is a Professor at the Auckland Bioengineering Institute and has a joint appointment with the Department of Engineering Science. He completed his Ph.D. in musculoskeletal biomechanics at The University of Western Australia in 2000 and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford University from 2003 to 2006. Thor established Stanford’s Human Performance Laboratory as the Director of Research and was a faculty member in the Department of Orthopaedics at Stanford from 2006 to 2010, before returning home to New Zealand in 2011. Thor’s research combines medical imaging with computational modeling to understand the mechanisms of musculoskeletal injury and disease. He has published more than 100 scientific articles.

Webinar 5 – Understanding external biomechanical load during ACLR rehabilitation

Description:

Blending science into the art of coaching – In this webinar Mark Armitage will discuss how he is exploring different wearable technologies to support him in the quantification of field-based rehabilitation. Using an ACLR case study he will give cutting edge applications into session and drill analysis to improve outcomes during ACL recovery.

About Mark Armitage:

Mark is an accredited (UKSCA) Strength and Conditioning Coach with a wealth of experience working within football. He has worked for Norwich, Southampton, Arsenal and Huddersfield Town Football Clubs as well as the English Football Association. He has a Degree in Sport and Exercise Science, Masters in Strength and Conditioning, Post-Graduate Certificate in Education and is a teaching Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Currently, Mark is completing his PhD at the University of Suffolk where he is the course leader for Strength and Conditioning. He is also a company Director of East Coast Conditioning and Rehabilitation.

Webinar 6 – Training Load Monitoring: The Athlete Adaptation Conundrum in Soccer

Description:

The advancement of sports technology in both the elite and amateur setting had led to an increased interest in how to best utilize such technology in order to appropriately monitor athletes. Whilst athlete monitoring is now routine practice for professional athletes, questions still remain around which variables are best placed to monitor ‘load’ and how they are interlinked with the athlete adaptation pathways. This talk will aim to discuss the current technology and practice that is used within the sector for athlete monitoring, with a focus on the gaps that still remain within the athlete monitoring conundrum.

About James Malone:

Dr. James Malone is currently a senior lecturer in coaching science at Liverpool Hope University and acts as a consultant for a number of sporting teams. Dr. Malone gained his PhD in 2013 whilst working as a sport scientist at Liverpool FC, being responsible for the daily monitoring of the 1st team squad. Following this, he spent 3 years working at sports tech firm Catapult Sports, as an applied sport scientist and education manager across the European region. Since 2015, Dr. Malone took up his current position at Liverpool Hope University, in which he continues to research into the latest developments around athlete monitoring, alongside his teaching duties at both undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Webinar 7 – Mass Wearable Sensor Deployment: Research Insights through Application

Description:

The Spaulding National Running Center, directed by Dr. Irene Davis, has been utilizing wearable sensor technologies across a variety of in-lab research domains for almost a decade, with a focus on running biomechanics and injury. The center also incorporates these technologies into their clinical workflow during assessment and gait retraining. Using the expertise gained through extensive lab and clinic integration of wearable devices, the SNRC has also conducted large-scale data collections in the real world including the Boston Marathon and NCAA collegiate basketball. During this webinar, you will hear from current members of the SNRC research team who aim to provide practical insights learned from their recent works. This will include applications where large-scale sensor deployment was required and also measurement validations that are critical for data integrity of this kind.

About Dr Julie Burland

Julie Burland, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow with the Spaulding National Running Center. Julie’s background is in the evaluation and recovery of neuromuscular function and psychosocial factors influencing post-operative and return to sport outcomes following ACL reconstruction. Julie’s current interests are focused on evaluating the relationship between cumulative impact load and biomarkers related to joint health in team sports. The aim of Julie’s research is to improve monitoring strategies to identify athletes at risk for lower extremity injuries.

About Jereme Outerleys

Jereme Outerleys is the Lab Manager and Engineer with the Spaulding National Running Center. Jereme applies an engineering skillset and extensive technical and analytical experience in biomechanics to leverage emerging technologies to tackle applied biomechanical problems. His interest is driven by incorporating lab and evidence-based biomechanical research to develop better tools and insights for clinical decision making.

About Dr Caleb Johnson

Caleb Johnson, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow with the Spaulding National Running Center. Caleb’s background is in musculoskeletal injury prevention in military populations and the application of perceptual-motor control to injury prevention and human performance. His current interests center on identifying risk factors for running-related musculoskeletal injuries and the ways in which these risk factors inform clinical practice in an effort to treat/prevent injury. Further, he is interested in the use of wearable sensors to identify changes in running behaviors when individuals are moved from the clinic/laboratory to real-world environments.

Webinar 8 – Practical Examples of Using IMU-Step to Modify Outcomes: Asymmetry and Impact Load in the Real World

Description:

Collecting Asymmetry and Impact Load metrics is a great first step, but how do you know when the changes you see in the metrics are significant? And what do you change in your practice when they are? Andrew Gray is a highly credentialed human performance specialist. Currently the High-Performance Manager at the Wests Tigers, he is also an IMU Applied Consultant as well as the Director of Athletic Data Innovations, a company that bridges the gap between tracking technologies and actionable insights. During this webinar, Andrew will share best practices on how to practically apply inertial data using his over two decades of experience in high performance. He will take you through real case studies so you can learn his process of how he turns the data he collects into improved outcomes for his athletes and patients.

Watch this webinar, the 8th in our series, to learn:

– What amount of impact asymmetry is significant

– How to use IMU-Step to help determine when an athlete can return to play

– How IMU devices are best utilized within a high-performance and rehabilitation program

About Andrew Gray

Andrew Gray is a highly credentialled Human Performance specialist with over two decades of successful experience in professional sport and consulting. Andrew specializes in the integration of Sports Medicine, Sport Science and Strength & Conditioning, as well as the innovative use of new technologies to progress human performance practices. Currently High-Performance Manager at the Wests Tigers in the National Rugby League (Australia), as well as Director at Athletic Data Innovations (ADI), which is a software business that bridges the gap between tracking technologies and the end-user, Andrew consults across multiple international sporting codes, within business, as well Defence. A strong believer in creating high performing environments that enable individuals to maximise their potential, Andrew also enjoys a good mountain or ocean adventure with his wife and two children.

Webinar 9 – Integrating Inertial Sensors into your Vicon Motion Capture System: Techniques and Applications

Description:

In this joint webinar with IMeasureU and Vicon, Life Science Support Engineer Nick Gallimore will take attendees through the integration of Blue Trident sensors into the Vicon Nexus system and discuss some practical applications for the integration.

About Nick Gallimore

Nick, MSc is a customer support engineer for Vicon Motion Systems, specializing in the Life Science and Engineering fields. Nick’s main role is to help customers achieve the maximum potential from their Vicon system and software, as well as completing system installations, and running software training courses. Before joining Vicon, Nick completed his degree in Sports Science and Physics, and Masters in Sports Biomechanics at Loughborough University.

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