Footnotes from the Field: Articles of the Week – July 31

By July 29, 2020 Articles of the Week

Here’s what the sports science team at IMeasureU is reading this week:

  1. Achilles tendinopathy rehabilitation and lower limb biomechanics

The first item this week comes from Colin Griffin at the Sports Surgery Clinic in Dublin. This is slightly different from our usual article after the IMeasureU sports science team, Dan Savin and Jaime Valadao spoke to Colin for the latest video in the article deep dive series. Rather than discussing an individual paper, Colin spoke about his PhD journey, being supervised by JB Morin what he aims to achieve from his latest study examining Achilles tendinopathy rehab.

  1. Groin injury risk of pubertal soccer players increases during peak height velocity due to changes in movement techniques

The second article in this week’s list comes from Thomas Dupré and Wolfgang Potthast in the Journal of Sports Science. To find the reason behind the increase in injury incidence when adolescent athletes undergo peak height velocity, the present study investigated if PHV influences hip joint kinematics, kinetics and adductor muscle forces in two groups of adolescent soccer players performing 90°-cutting manoeuvres and inside passing. Results from the anthropometrics and force measurements suggest that the moments of inertia of the participants’ extremities increase faster than the muscles can adapt and a higher abduction moment of MID (less than half a year before or after PHV) likely increases the load on the adductor muscles through a change of technique.

  1. Improved Ankle Mobility After a 4-Week Training Program Affects Landing Mechanics: A Randomized Controlled Trial

The final article comes from Louis Howe and colleagues in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. The authors examined the effects of a 4-week ankle mobility intervention on landing mechanics. The findings suggest that changes in landing strategies following the performance of a strength training program are specific to whether restrictions in ankle mobility are considered as part of the intervention.

For more sports science check out our blog for in-depth case studies and industry updates. Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter below so you are always up to date with the latest research.

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